• The boat, Audeamus
    The boat, Audeamus

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July 15, 2017 began the sailing adventure of a lifetime!  My awesome girlfriend, JoAnne, crewmate extraordinaire, Drew Hoffman, and I threw off the lines at Shilshole Marina to set sail for the Sea of Cortez...or at least that was the big hairy awesome goal for this first stage of the adventure.

So, I sold my truck! Here’s how the sale and drop rolled out. I stowed my bike in the back of the truck, did a Kelly Bluebook exchange with a dealer because getting that much cash from a private sale was probably not going to happen. I signed my wheels away and jumped on my bike to ride to the Port of Everett to check out boat storage on the hard.

 

It was supposed to snow, but ended up being a most excellent day with sunshine, birds singing, and I had a most excellent exercise high. Life couldn’t be better. The sweet smell of liberation from a vehicle. What could go wrong!? I was thinking this about a year ago in Greece when I took a spectacular fall riding from Athens to Corinthos and broke my clavicle.

After years of procrastination, I have finally started using this site as a work in progress. Don't get me wrong, I didn't set it up out of an obligation for some altruistic vision to enlighten current and future travelers/learners. I set it up, with the awesome assistance of John Locke, my technology guru, because my usual communication venues of Google and Facebook were blocked when I traveled to Tibet and China in 2017. This site is for my friends, family, and former students who may be interested to know that I am not dead and still alive to tell about it!

With that, here is the continuation of an incredible journey that started after six months in Diego Garcia, with very cool adventures in Singapore and Nepal, until I discovered Facebook and Google were banned in Tibet and the rest of China. 

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Aerial view of Everest

When I was an overconfident senior in high school, I visited my guidance counselor for the first time towards the end of my senior year. Yup, I had done everything up to that point—schedule my own classes, monitor my progress, and make sure I was on track to graduate. When I was called into his office, he asked me “So, Mr. Duffin, what do you want to do after high school?” My response: “Travel.” His response: “Great…see you later! Next.” That was the end of my interaction with my high school guidance counselor, but the memory of that interaction has lingered to this very day.